The UFO Crash at Coyame

Updated on April 15, 2019
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Passionate writer of both non-fiction and fiction. Interested in science, science fiction, and otherworldly phenomena.

Did Something Crash in Northern Mexico?

What crashed in the Mexican desert in 1974?
What crashed in the Mexican desert in 1974?

It Began One Summer Night

Late one evening, a small plane left the El Paso airport. Its destination? Mexico City. No one knows who exactly was on the plane. There have been conflicting reports that a flight plan was filed while others have stated that there was none. Some believe it was covered up in order to mask what happened that day. Others believe that the pilot of the plane was a drug courier. Whoever the pilot was, he had no idea what was to come, and he would never make it to Mexico City. His fate would begin a chain of events that would lead not only to his death but to the deaths of many in the Mexican military.

The Texas El Paso Airport
The Texas El Paso Airport

The Collision

As his plane ascended on that summer day and settled into its flight across the Mexican border, the pilot was unaware of what was flying in from the gulf. Another aircraft was traveling at high speed, over 2500 miles an hour at an altitude of 75000 feet. Initially, it headed for Texas but then turned into Mexico. It descended to 45000 feet and then slowed to just under 2000 miles an hour. Finally, the unknown aircraft leveled off at 20000 feet.

Just like the pilot of the small plane, the name of the pilot of the other aircraft was also unknown. Then the unthinkable happened. Both aircraft collided and went down in the desert near the town of Coyame.

Not of This World

From what is understood, the pilot and his plane had originated from Mexico, so the FAA was not required to investigate but US officials did offer assistance but were declined by Mexican officials. The US was aware of the event since the whole incident was monitored on radar up to the point of collision when they lost contact with both aircraft.

The high speed of the second aircraft and its erratic flight path is what initially alarmed the US air defense network. Later, after eavesdropping on Mexican communications, it became more aware to the US military who was piloting the second aircraft. They didn’t know his name but they were certain of one thing. He wasn’t from this world.

Coyame Mexico, roughly 250 miles south of El Paso, Texas
Coyame Mexico, roughly 250 miles south of El Paso, Texas | Source

Something Is Wrong

This second unidentified craft surprisingly was nearly intact even though it obliterated the small plane. When Mexican personnel arrived at the second crash site they were shocked to find that the second aircraft was actually a disk shaped object. It had damage on one side with a small rupture, exposing the inside of the unidentified object to the outside elements.

Once the Mexican military was aware of what they had found, communications suddenly stopped. Even though the blackout was ordered, the US used satellite and spy plane reconnaissance to monitor what was going on.

What they saw was that the object was small enough to just fit on a flat bed truck, of which the Mexican personnel used to transport it. With a convoy of vehicles, they headed south with both the object and the wreckage of the small plane, but then for some inexplicable reason they stopped moving. A US spy plane fly over revealed that all of the personnel were unconscious, and this is when the US military made their move to capture the object.

The US Quickly Assembles a Team to Capture the Object

With four helicopters, three hueys, and a super stallion, the US headed across the border. As a precaution, they donned biohazard protection. When the US personnel arrived at the convoy they found that all of the members of the Mexican recovery team were dead. Quickly they hoisted the object off of the flat bed with the super stallion and then they proceeded to eliminate all of the evidence including the bodies. The US recovery team used a good amount of explosives. They did this, not only to eliminate evidence, but to also possibly prevent any further contamination.

Is This a True Story?

The collision occurred the night of August 24, 1974. The recovery took place the morning after. A few possible locations that the object was taken to were of course Area 51, Fort Bliss, or Wright Patterson.

Did this event actually occur? It is a fairly fantastic story. However, there could be other explanations for what really happened. Here are a few possibilities:

  • The air space around Coyame is a known route for drug traffickers. What if one of the courier aircraft had to make an emergency landing. If the Mexican police and even the army showed up to investigate it could have ended in violence with casualties on both sides, and thus the story of dead soldiers in the desert.
  • The novel, “The Andromeda Strain” by Michael Crichton was published in 1969 and the movie was released in 1971. The novel story does have an uncanny resemblance to this collision story that supposedly occurred three years later.

There could always be a more earthly explanation and if that were true, then how did this story come about? Who made it up? Many UFO reports can be explained but there are a small percentage that defy a terrestrial explanation. Maybe this is one of them.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

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